Dred Scott vs. Sanford

Dred Scott vs. Sanford

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Dred Scott vs. Sanford

The Background: Dred Scott vs. Sanford
Dred Scott vs. Sanford is one of the most famous cases in the history of the United States. Dred Scott vs. Sanford is commonly referred to as the “Dred Scott Case.” The Dred Scott vs. Sanford case is a monumental moment in civil rights history. In the case, Dred Scott was the plaintiff. He was an African-American slave belonging to John Emerson. Both men lived in the state of Missouri; slavery was allowed in the state of Missouri. 
The case of Dred Scott vs. Sanford deals with slave rights. John Emerson was the slave owner of Dred Scott. John Emerson moved to the state of Illinois and took Dred Scott with him. The case is rooted in this move because Illinois was a state where slavery was outlawed. After spending over a decade in Illinois and other Midwestern states, Dred Scott refused to move with Emerson when the man wanted to return to Missouri. 
Dred Scott claimed that he was no longer tied to Sanford because of the move. Dred Scott claimed that he was no longer a slave because Illinois did not allow slavery. Dred Scott then sued Emerson’s estate—the estate was represented by the executor, Mr. John Sanford. Dred Scott claimed that he was freed from being a slave because of Illinois’s laws. 
Dred Scott vs. Sanford: The Case Profile
In Dred Scott vs. Sanford, Dred Scott sued Emerson’s estate for unlawfully detaining Dred Scott. Dred Scott vs. Sanford was heard in the Supreme Court of Missouri. The Verdict of Dred Scott vs. Sanford was delivered on March 6th of 1857. 
Dred Scott vs. Sanford: The Verdict
The state Supreme Court in Dred Scott vs. Sanford ruled in favor of Sanford. The state ruled in favor of Sanford because the court found that slaves were not considered to be full citizens of the United States. Because of this, the legislation within the United States Constitution was not applicable and as a result, Dred Scott was forced to return to slavery. 
Although Dred Scott cited the 5th Amendment of the Constitution as his defense, citing that this Amendment prevents the unlawful abuse of power undertaken by a governing body, the fact that slaves were not considered citizenships, the amendment was deemed null and void. 

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